Thursday, December 3, 2015

Keyhole neckline tutorial

I haven't posted on here for ages, but I thought I should document how I made this keyhole neckline for some Nativity/Christmas Pageant tabard costume thingies. please read through these instructions before starting this project.

First, take your keyhole neckline pattern (perhaps I'll make another post on how to draft this) and trace it onto the non adhesive side of some fusable interfacing. (this is the side without the bumps)  I like to use crayola markers because they are cheap and come out when you wash the fabric.

make sure to mark the fold lines, they will help when you place the cut out keyhole on your fabric later.  I also like to poke a hole in my pattern to mark where the slit in the keyhole ends, then use a ruler to connect it to the fold line.

Cut roughly around your interfacing. DO NOT cut out the center hole.

roughly cut your fabric to the same shape as your interfacing and pin it together.

Your non bumpy side of the interfacing should be on top. If your fabric has a wrong side, it should be facing you if you flip the fabric sandwich over. ( bumpy side and right side of fabric should be touching.)

The line you have traced onto your interfacing is the sewing line.  Sew along this line on the exterior line only. (we'll work with that center circle later)

cut around, about 1 cm from where you've sewn.

snip where the round part meets the straight part, and trim the tips of the 3 pointed corners.  This will help the fabric lay flat when you turn it.

clip "v" shapes all around the rounded part of the exterior of the keyhole shape.  (this will also help the fabric lay flat later) Take care not to snip where you've sewn.  (make sure you pitch all those little triangles before stupid cat eats them.  No one wants to clean up pukie in the middle of a craft project.)

cut a slit ONLY in the interfacing.

remove your pins and turn the whole thing right side out.  Finger press the seams flat.  DO NOT use an iron.  If you use an iron you'll fuse the thing to your ironing board.  Once the keyhole shape has been turned right side out, trace over the lines from the front. The marker will have bled through slightly so it's easy to trace.  This step isn't necessary, but I find it's easier to see when I'm sewing.

since I'm sewing this to a tabard, I've folded the fabric in half width-wise and lengthwise. Line the keyhole up with the fold marks on your tabard, and your pattern.

pin your keyhole to the fabric. The wrong side of the tabard should be facing up, along with the bumpy part of the interfacing on the keyhole.

sew along marked line around circular part. When you get to the straight line down the middle, sew about 1/8inch on and around line.

cut about 1 cm from where you stitched in the round part and carefully down the center line. cut out  notches as you did when you sewed around the outside of the circle.

clip the corner where the round part meets the straight part. Clip a "V" shape where the straight line ends. These cuts will help the fabric lay better once turned.

Remove pins and turn so the bumpy part of the interfacing touches the right side of your tabard fabric.  At this point you can use an iron to fuse the fabric together, following the manufacture instructions for your fusable interfacing.  Or, if you have cats that are trying to burn your house down by knocking your iron over before it can heat up, finger press the seams, and pin.

It may take some finagling to get the bottom part of the keyhole slit to lay nicely.  This is quite normal and can usually be made to behave with a bit of tugging of the garment fabric before it's pinned down.

stitch around inside and outside edges of keyhole shape close to the edge.  If you're feeling fancy, you can zig zag the edges or use some sort of decorative stitch for embelishment. Viola!  You've made a keyhole neckline!

If, for some reason, you don't want to have this keyhole as a contrasting color to the front of your garment, simply place the keyhole shape on the right side of the garment fabric instead of the wrong side.  This will ensure that your keyhole shape is on the inside of your garment.

Ideally this is reversible, however, sometimes the tip of the slit on the point, on the wrong side, get's wonky.  This probably could have been remedied by fusing the fabric together.  I was lazy and also didn't want the cats to burn down the house.  My fabrics were not the same thickness either.  This can also account for the wonky bunching.  I'm satisfied that it looks good from the contrasting fabric side so I've not unpicked and fussed with it.

Monday, June 29, 2015

PB Butterscotch Bread

Peanut Butter Butterscotch Bread via Today's Creative life
2 c flour
½ c sugar
1 t salt
2 t baking powder
1 c peanut butter
1 egg
1 c milk
1 c butterscotch chips

Stir flour, sugar, salt, baking powder into med  bowl. Using a fork, blend peanut butter into mixture until crumbly. In separate bowl, blend egg and milk .Add egg mix to pb mix and stir until moistened.
Fold in chips Pour into 9x5 bread pan. Bake at 350° for 45 min til toothpick comes out clean. You may need to use tin foil tent to prevent browning. Once it's finished, remove bread from pan and place on a wire rack to cool completely before cutting.

notes: this bread is highly addictive, so consider yourself warned!

Egg noodles from scratch

Five Minute Homemade Egg Noodles via Real Life Dinner
2 eggs
2 tbsp milk
½ tsp salt
pinch of pepper
1½-2 cups flour + more for rolling out

Whisk eggs, milk, salt and pepper.Add flour, (start out with 1¼ c and add until dough begins to form. Knead 1 min to get dough into a ball shape.  Roll out very thinly on generously floured surface
Slice dough into ¼-1/2 in slices with a pizza cutter and gently place in boiling soup. Let noodles cook in boiling water for 10-15 min before serving.

notes: I was expecting these to be like the egg noodles you buy at the store.  They are not.  They were still good, but tasted more like the flat style dumplings.  Again, very tasty, just not what I was hoping for.

Chicken Vesuvio

Chicken Vesuvio via 52 ways to grill
3 LARGE Chicken Breasts, bone in, skin on (I used boneless and skinless)
Salt and Pepper to Season
2 T Not Your Grandmother's Herbs de Provence divided
4 Russet Potatoes Cut into wedges, skins on
4 c Chicken broth*
1 c Red Wine Vinegar*
12 cloves Garlic
1 c frozen Peas

Season chicken with Salt, Pepper and 1T Herbes de Provence. Coat bottom of  skillet with thin layer of Oil, brown chicken. Remove chicken and add potato to brown in the oil and fat While browning, add the Garlic.Once potatoes browned, deglaze pan with red wine vinegar and add chicken stock.
Add potatoes and garlic to stock, top those with chicken breasts, sprinkle on remaining T  Herbs de Provence and cover. Continue to cook over med heat til chicken reaches 150F, then add peas. When the chicken reaches 160F, remove and allow to rest for 5 min.
*I doubled the amt of stock and vinegar because I wanted extra sauce.  Feel free to use less if you are not a fan of sauce.

Herbes de Provence

Herbes de Provence via 52 ways to grill
1 part dried Tarragon
1 part dried Oregano
1 part dried Dill
1 part dried Thyme
1 part dried Rosemary
1 part dried Garlic Flakes (i used garlic powder)
1/2 part Sea Salt
1/2 part Fresh ground Pepper*
1/2 part dried Lemon Zest*

Combine all ingredients.
*I didn't have lemon zest so instead of 1/2 part pepper and 1/2 part zest I just used 1/2 part lemon pepper

Crockpot Chicken Parm Soup

Chicken Parmesan soup for the crock pot via Baked by Rachael
3/4 C carrots, chopped
3/4 C onion, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
30 oz petite diced tomatoes, drained
1 1/2 t salt
1 t  pepper
1 t orgeano
7 1/2 C chicken broth
6 oz spinach
3/4 C pasta

1 lb gr chicken (or turkey)
1/2 C Parmesan cheese
1/2 C plain breadcrumbs
1/4 t salt
1/4 t pepper
1/2 - 1 t red pepper flakes
1 egg

Mozzarella, shredded

To crockpot add carrots, onions, garlic, drained tomatoes, salt, pepper, oregano and chicken broth. Cover and cook on high for 4 hrs. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 350°F. Line a baking sheet with parchment. In large bowl, combine meatball ingredients. Using sm cookie scoop, shape balls. Place on prepared baking sheet, bake for 10-15 min. Add meatballs to slow cooker, replace cover and continue cooking. When 4 hrs are up, gently stir in pasta and spinach. Cover and cook for 30 min.

Divide soup between oven safe bowls. Sprinkle with mozzarella. Bake until cheese is fully melted. If using broiler safe containers, broiler may be used to brown cheese. (I just added the cheese to the soup in the crockpot and let it get all stringy and melty as I did not have oven safe bowls.)

crock pot buffalo lasagna

Buffalo Chicken lasagna for the crock pot adapted slightly from A kitchen addiction
9 lasagna noodles
3 C chicken, cooked and shredded
12 oz buffalo sauce
1½ C spaghetti sauce
1 bell pepper, chopped
14 oz can diced tomatoes, drained
15 oz cottage cheese
1½ C shredded mozzarella cheese
¾ C shredded cheddar cheese, divided
¾ C feta cheese crumbles, divided

In large bowl, stir chicken, sauces, peppers, and tomatoes. In small bowl, stir cottage cheese, mozzarella , ½ c cheddar , and ½ c feta. Spread about 1½ c chicken mix in bottom of  5-6 qt slow cooker. Layer with 3 noodles (may need to break noodles to fit). Top with 1½ c chicken mix. Top with ⅓  cheese mix. Top with another 3 noodles. Repeat with another layer of chicken mix, cheese mix and 3 noodles. On the top of the last noodles, top with remaining chicken mixture and remaining ⅓ of cheese mix. Sprinkle with remaining ¼ c cheddar and ¼ c feta. Cover and cook on low for 4-5 hr or high for 2.5-3 hrs. Turn off heat and allow to sit 15 min before serving.